A Different History by Sujata Bhatt Notes Essay

A Different History by Sujata Bhatt Notes Essay

The poet explores the relationship among cultural personality and terminology. When you speak a language you also find out its tradition. Lines 19 and twenty sum up the theme. Which in turn language has not been the oppressor’s tongue? When ever another region is the conquerer, that nation brings its language and culture to those who are conquered. In the beginning the sculpt is critical in the culture in the west (e. g. the fact that west will not show respect for books). Later the tone is definitely accepting. She says that once people have assimilated the new tradition, the afterwards generations like the language and culture. The other stanza offers all the lines indented similarly as the author conveys crucial message that most languages are imposed by the oppressor. IMAGES POINT: Stanza 1 begins by assessing the Ancient greek language and Of india gods. Subsequent the poem focuses on the reverential attitude towards books in India. The word ‘without’ is repeated for emphasis. In India, books happen to be handled cautiously ‘gently’ to exhibit respect intended for Sarasvati, the Hindu goddess of Knowledge, and for the forest where the gods are. | *Pan- In Greek religious beliefs and mythology, Pan may be the god with the wild, shepherds and flocks, mountains, hunting Sarasvati – the Hindu goddess of Knowledge presides within the arts and it is frequently worshipped in your local library. POINT: Stanza 2 the poet declares that every whilst every terminology has come in the conquering international locations and is at first resisted, it truly is later appreciated by the foreseeable future generations. The metaphor from the ‘long scythe swooping out’ is an image of the intense destruction of the culture of the oppressed and replacing that with the tradition of the conqueror. | the unborn grandchildrengrow to appreciate that odd language| The poet argues that as luck would have it over many generations, the oppressed people come rounded to speaking the conqueror’s language and what is more to embracing their culture. She points out the irony of history. |

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