Analysis of Theme for English Essay

Analysis of Theme for English Essay

The premise behind this kind of poem is that the speaker is actually a black university student whose instructor has given his college students an job to write a paper regarding themselves. While the poem takes the reader through his walk home from class fantastic thought process about “who this individual is”, the final line of the poem, “This is my personal page intended for English B” (ll. 41) suggests that this kind of poem is a paper this individual has drafted for course. Langston Barnes wrote this kind of poem through the Harlem Renaissance of the late 1910s, so a audience might instantly assume that the primary topic consists of race or perhaps racial bias. The second stanza almost will take this direction if the speaker says that he could be “the only colored pupil in [his] class” (ll. 10). Another stanza changes directions, even though, when the audio, addressing his white instructor, says, “I guess staying colored doesn’t make me not like / precisely the same things folks like who have are other races” (ll. 25-26). This suggests that he is certainly not, because he is black, distinct from others, but rather, the same. White colored people might think that his preferences are very different, but they are in fact similar. Requesting “So is going to my web page be shaded that I write” (ll. 27) is a creative play on his identity that will come across in the paper he will probably write pertaining to class; can it reflect his “blackness”?, this individual wonders. That “will not really be white” (ll. 28) he is aware, since he can not, however it will somewhat reflect his instructor, the one who provided the job. After all, both he wonderful instructor are human (“yet a part of me, as I i am a part of you” (ll. 32)). As the poem closes, the speaker draws his conclusions regarding his very own racial identification: he forget about wants to always be white than his white instructor really wants to be black, but there is absolutely no denying the similarity together. He’ll learn from the instructor (“As I study from you”(ll. 37)) but the instructor will also study from him (“I guess you learn from me” (ll. 38)). Perhaps he thinks the trainer does not understand what it’s like to be black. A quick scan through the lines of this composition reveals the frequent usage of the words “I”, “me”, and “you”, which can be a idea for the poem’s general theme:  should one get his id through his race, or perhaps through common, everyday elements, likes and dislikes, pleasant pastimes and perceptions of life? In lines 6-15 only, the word “I” is used to ask questions, notify his grow older, race, and birthplace, his college, and route house to the Harlem Branch YMCA. This is how this individual identifies him self outwardly to others. The third stanza uses “I” and “me” to evaluate himself to “you”, the trainer. The loudspeaker identifies him self with Harlem in the lines which go through “But I suppose I’m what / I believe and see and hear, Harlem, I notice you: / hear you, hear me personally – all of us two – you, me, talk on this page” (ll. 17-19). A large number of black people during this time were inspired simply by Harlem’s empowerment of their community. Having a dark heritage was seen as great and black poets, musicians and experts thrived in Harlem. The speaker provides likely recently been encouraged by living in Harlem, and therefore perceives his dark-colored identity in direct comparison to “you”, the white-colored identity of his instructor. He’s not entirely sure, though, since the short range “Me – who? ” (ll. 20) indicates that his identity isn’t obvious to him, or maybe to whites. The fourth stanza’s bottom line about this issue recognizes that to allow blacks to be proud of their traditions is “American” (ll. 33). While this kind of poem doesn’t seem to employ specific radical language, there is one illustration of stabreim which makes a neat point. In the third stanza, the speaker highlights the things he enjoys that help to determine him, which includes “records – Bessie, bop, or Bach” (ll. 24). This intentional alliteration pinpoints three different types of music: a jazz singer (Bessie Smith), the bop genre, and Bach (classical), to point out that even a dark-colored man whose culture strongly identifies with jazz and bop music, can like classical music which is generally associated with white colored culture. The alliteration acts to highlight the “sameness” of such three, all of these he enjoys, but their big difference lies in their particular cultural organizations. Although there is zero specific rhyme scheme, inside rhyme throughout and the vocally mimic eachother at the end seem intentional. The interior rhyme has an almost sing-song sound to it, and supplies a beautiful circulation from range to range. In lines 16-17, the vocally mimic eachother of “true”, “you” and “two” plus the enjambment from the lines generally seems to ask the question “what is true of ‘you’ and me”? This same rhyme patter is repeated in the last stanza in lines 35-36, “Nor do I generally want to be a part of you. as well as But we could, that’s the case! ”. This kind of seems to solution the question: the most popular factor between “you” and “me” is that we are a part of each other, “that’s true! ”. As the speaker comes to this decision in the end, the tone is definitely final and the end vocally mimic eachother becomes also, as though his decision is final and right. He says “I speculate you learn via me – / even though you’re old – and white – / and somewhat more free. / This is my page pertaining to English B”. The vocally mimic eachother of “me”, “free” and “B” advise an answer to his question: the trainer will learn from him, although it will never immediately replace the identity of any person, black or white. This is among my favorite poetry because of its beat and vocally mimic eachother. Lines just like “Harlem, I hear you: / hear you, hear me – we two – you, me” (ll. 18-19) and the last several have a rhythm just like music and the words simply flow by my mouth area as I read them. They’re short and simple, but load up such an excellent punch. And while I cannot understand the ethnic divide thus present in this kind of poem, I love to think about just how being white is presumed, and being black is usually not. It was probably such a simple job for the professor to give, yet how many of the white-colored students could have written about being “white”? And does the speaker think that the instructor will expect him to write down about becoming black? And can his newspaper reflect staying black or perhaps will it be in the same way “white” while the others? Barnes makes a use this concept with all the line “So will my personal page become colored i write? ” (ll. 27). For me, this poem is straightforward to understand although not overly simple. The concept can be described as complex one particular, but can be presented in a way that makes it appear like a neat little package.

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