Analysis of John Keats’ “On the Sonnet” Essay

Analysis of John Keats’ “On the Sonnet” Essay

In John Keats’ “On the Sonnet, ” he tendencies fellow poets to not let their poetic genius, all their “Muse” pass away, because it is limited to the variables of then-current Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnet forms. Although he uses neither kind, (thus necessitating further analysis to determine the reasoning of his poem), his use of significance makes his message a lot more than clear. He starts the poem with an meaning to Andromeda, “who, relating to Traditional myth, was chained to a rock in order that she would end up being devoured by a sea monster” (Norton 799). He uses this graphic to represent the fate of poetry, if this follows the unsatisfactory kind of either Petrarchan or Shakespearean sonnets. This kind of image can be portrayed in the first 3 lines, “If by uninteresting rhymes our English should be chained, /And like Andromeda, the sonnet sweet /Fettered, in spite of discomfort and sophistication, ” which may be translated because “If the poetry should be confined by current sonnet forms, and face the fate of Andromeda, in spite of our mindful attention…[then…]. ” The 2nd clause of the thought introduced in lines one particular through 3, the implied “then, ” is found in lines four through nine. Keats writes, “Let us locate, if we must be constrained, /Sandals more interwoven and complete /To fit the naked feet of Poesy: /Let all of us inspect the lyre, and weigh the stress /Of every chord, and find out what may be gained /By ear industrious, and focus meet. ” According to the footnote provided in Norton, Poesy refers to a need voiced in a letter, by which Keats had written out this composition and then reviewed his “impatience with the classic Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnet forms: ‘I have been endeavoring to discover a better sonnet stanza than we certainly have. '” The phrase “lyre” often means “harp, ” but can be a symbol intended for “lyric poems, ” and “chord” often means “a line of a game, such as a harp, ” yet can also label poetry, according to the Oxford English language Dictionary. With this thought, lines four through nine can be construed to imply, “[if we must end up being chained like this], in that case let’s discover intricately weaved sandals, (symbolic of new, undocumented sonnet varieties; Keats’ “need”), to fulfill my personal need: let’s inspect the harp (symbolic of lyric poetry), and listen to every single chord (continuing the metaphor of the harp, chords will be symbolic of lines within lyric poetry), and let’s see that which we can accomplish through cautious listening and attention. ” Finally, in the last five lines of the sonnet, Keats immediately addresses his fellow poets as “misers, ” that includes a double that means. According to the Oxford English Book, “misers” means “poets, ” but it also means “miserable persons. ” This kind of intentional phrase pun communicates Keats’ perspective that poets are currently miserable, because of the inability of the current sonnet varieties. In lines eight through just fourteen, he publishes articles, “Misers of sound and syllable, no less /Than Midas of his coins, let us always be /Jealous of dead leaves in the bay-wreath crown; /So, if we may not let the Muse be free of charge, /She will probably be bound with garlands of her own. ” Midas was a california king who had the energy to turn exactly what he touched into precious metal. According to Norton, “jealous” meant “suspiciously watchful. ” Also, with reference to “the bay-wreath crown, ” according to the 6th footnote, “The bay woods was holy to Apollo, god of poetry, and bay wreaths came to symbolize true poetic achievement. The withering of the bay woods is sometimes regarded an omen of death. ” Keats continued the idea, implying that whenever the leaves of the bay-wreath crown, which represents “true poetic achievements, ” begin to die, they are a alert of death to that extremely piece of beautifully constructed wording. Finally “Muse” refers to a poet’s motivation, which may be wiped out once it truly is “bound” by dying leaves (garland) with the bay-wreath top, ” which can be accomplished by certainly not using one’s Muse to its maximum creative potential. These lines can thus be converted as “Fellow miserable/ disappointed poets, let’s be ‘suspiciously watchful’ of omens of death to the poetry; if we do not let our inspiration work free, it will eventually die also. ” Ruben Keats, naturally disillusioned by available forms through which to write down poetry, communicates his unhappiness in his sonnet, “On the Sonnet. ” Because he uses an uncertain, unidentifiable sonnet form, rather than the Shakespearean or the Petrarchan sonnet forms, the integrity of his disagreement is certainly not undermined. In this way, not only does he express his hatred for the current sonnet forms, but refuses to use them as he convey this disappointment in his individual sonnet.

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