Ulysses And Tennysons Narrative Techniques Essay

Ulysses And Tennysons Narrative Techniques Essay

A: Look once again at “Ulysses” and talk about Tennyson’s narrative techniques In “Ulysses”, Tennyson reveals the characteristics and attitudes in the eponymous central character throughout the dynamic type of the remarkable monologue. Through an adroit mixing up of literary techniques which include those of framework, form and language, this individual seeks to clarify much of the mystique lurking behind the mythological background of Ulysses, and reveal his persona of desire and heroism, alongside his unwanted traits of contemptuousness and hubristic take great pride in. Throughout the poem, its form and composition allow Tennyson to reveal the character of Ulysses as he wants him to get portrayed. “Ulysses” takes the proper execution of the dramatic monologue, with Tennyson adapting the identity of his mythical character and employing this form to reveal Ulysses’ personality through his own words. This selection of form, combined with structural use of unrhymed iambic pentameter, or perhaps blank verse, allows the poem to adopt a rhythm that is one of many closest imitators of individual speech in verse. This will make the words that Tennyson, writes and Ulysses “speaks” carry out a much more personal tone and a much deeper meaning, completely disclosing his character and attitude in a manner that a more manufactured and structured form, for example the Spenserian, merely could not achieve. This effect is added to the by extensive and contrasted uses of enjambment and caesurae, further imitating the interesting depth and truthfulness of presentation rhythms, examples being “The long day wanes: The slow moon climbs: the deep/Moans rounded with many voices”, the shown pauses of “wanes” and “climbs” accentuating the poor performace of the day and moon, and the enjambment throughout the deep straining the true profundity of said “deep”. Furthermore, the intensive use of enjambment allies together with the themes of endeavour for an excessive, nearly unattainably unreasonable level, the line “beyond the utmost bound of human thought” exemplifying this, the poem runs onto the excess of Ulysses’ mind. Finally, the balance between lines and theme is usually important- twenty-six lines carry on the passion of Ulysses’ previous research, and an additional twenty-six embark on his desires, fears and attitudes intended for and towards future. In comparison, he usually spends only 12 lines on his government and responsibility, and will spare simply a single nasty indictment, “aged wife” intended for the at any time faithful Penelope. This framework echoes the theme of responsibility against detachment- Ulysses’ extreme description of himself and the fleeting reference to his topics illustrates his abdication of responsibility and the egocentric characteristics of his character, though this could be anticipated from a great classical king. It also exemplifies the excessiveness of Ulysses’ ambition, a surplus that while the monologue progresses, can be seen to grow to include the boundaries of the foolish, the harmful and the not possible. However just as much of his verse, the primary techniques that Tennyson uses to portray the suggestions and topics of Ulysses’ character happen to be those of images and vocabulary. This is especially evident through the contrasting imagery and rhythm of his description of his people against his activities. The initial symbolism of the composition, of an “idle king”, as well as the “barren crags” of his kingdom of Ithica, creates a sculpt of boredom, suggesting Ulysses’ lack of passion or feeling for his tasks and whom unto his duties are performed. This takes an additional level together with his description of his own people, “Unequal laws on to a fierce, ferocious race, /That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not really me”. This description displays his disregard and deficiency of compassion pertaining to his persons, as they are presented a ancient, uneducated character as opposed to his own illustrious nature that is certainly revealed through the poem. Furthermore, the lack of even a personal pronoun, “that” instead of “who”, for instance , furthers the distance between him and his people, the idea of distance being inverted in conjunction with regarding responsibility. The ultimate nature on this point is its structure- the monosyllabic, strong and harsh surpasses of “hoard, and sleep, and feed” portray the tedium that Ulysses views himself to rule. This kind of contrasts immediately with the opening descriptions of Ulysses individual character, fantastic views and memories of his past adventures. This individual states, “I cannot snooze from travelling: I will drink/Life to the lees”, with the enjambment through the two lines laying out the excess as well as the metaphorical usage of the “lees” that he strives to reach- the words could also recommend a problem however , with all the extent so that as he eats so much of life, he will inevitably take in the significantly less desirable and the negative elements. This ingestion imagery went on with “For always running around with a starving heart/Much I have seen and known: metropolitan areas of men/And manners, environments, councils, governments”, the detailed monosyllables today highlighting what lengths he went, rather than the level of his contempt in the last usage- this kind of highlighting the contrasting aspects of Ulysses’ character. Tennyson as well employs the technique of antithesis to focus on the extent of Ulysses’ zeal to get travel, and show that the may reach the realms of foolishness, introducing the concept of the enchantement of the not possible. He declares “All instances I have enjoyed/Greatly, have suffered greatly, the two with those/That loved myself, and alone”, the use of opposite in the photos and the enjambment of the lines combining to highlights Ulysses’ powerful, practically excessive desire to have travel- the extra continues through “the intoxicated delight of battle”, as he metaphorically revels in the resentment of war to the extent that it is almost an habit of the head, to the extent that this individual has “become a name”. This can be construed in many ways- he could be noted world over to get his wonderful journeys, or left basically as a shadow of a gentleman, with just the superficiality of a name to back up his prior greatness, his involvement with “a a part of all that I use met”. He then moves on to of puro imagery stuffed with gravitas- “Yet all encounter is an arch wherethro’/Gleams that untravll’d world, in whose margin fades/For ever and ever after i move”, the enjambment from the lines showcasing the fading of the posture, as if he may never always be satisfied, the unattainable is the most desirable. This continues to the extent of “To adhere to knowledge just like a sinking star, /Beyond the utmost bound of human thought”, the simile of divino permanence getting juxtaposed against its own “sinking” possibly revealing an acceptance of his plausibly misguided nature, and the exaggeration of “utmost bound of man thought” displaying the mischief in his wants, or simply showcasing the fervent heroism that runs through the poem. The tone from the imagery changes upon his reference to Telemachus- his boy who will inherit his name of Ruler. He explains him while “blameless” and “decent to not fail”, closing the reference to his son with “He works his work, I actually mine”. This shallow reward highlights a caring for his son, but more curiously reintroduces his contempt and condescension towards his responsibilities- the final patronising and intensely accented “I mine” implying a scornful attitude for the insignificant responsibilities that he considers Kingship to be. These descriptive epithets of Telemachus, “blameless”, “discerning”, are voiced with a great air of indifference bordering on malevolent contempt, and turn into ironic through Ulysses’ individual abdication of duty, although this does not have effect of removing the depraved tone. The shortening of the lines the moment referring to Telemachus also relate with his frame of mind through structure- the enthusiasm of the enjambment and fleshed out lines of his memories (and future programs further about in the monologue) is substituted by brief, sharp lines, as if they may be confined, as opposed to the free flowing, almost separated verse of his thoughts. As the tone improvements with thoughts of the future, he talks of his trusted mariners, individuals who have “Toil’d, and wrought, and thought with me”, the application of “thought” more than “fought” being an interesting idea, possibly featuring Ulysses’ earlier intellectual brilliance over his “savage” competition. He then progresses to talk of death and its particular consequences- “Death closes almost all: but something ere the conclusion, /Some work of commendable note, may yet end up being done”, his acceptance of death’s truth juxtaposed against his mind-boggling zeal to get exploration heightening the impression of purpose to a feasible extent of foolishness. This really is furthered by lines like “It could possibly be that we shall touch the Happy Isles…/ One equivalent temper of heroic hearts/Made weak by time and destiny, but strong in will”, the idea of the acceptance of your time and destiny being better than himself removing the previous hubristic sculpt that supported his terms. The final series, “To endeavor, to seek, to find and not to yield”, exemplifies all that can be revealed regarding Ulysses in the monologue- he will endure for the end, if if it is the ideal, or even most rational span of action- his desire will certainly conquer all, as much as this individual accepts that ultimately, loss of life has the same enduring electric power. In conclusion, Tennyson uses various literary gadgets to represent the nature and attitudes of the mythological figure of Ulysses. Through artfully blending officially adept poetic devices up against the purest indicate of man speech, he reveals the multi faceted character of Ulysses through his terms, allowing the reader to fully understand the motives in back of Ulysses’ apparently limitless ambition, and the even more sinister electricity this aspirations can hold to the detriment with the individual- a strong message to society, and an hunt for one of the most amazing characters of mythology. W: How far do you really agree the character of Ulysses is far from brave? Tennyson’s dramatic monologue, “Ulysses” has been put through many literary interpretations since its first composing in 1833, just several weeks after the death of Tennyson’s closest friend, Hallam. One of the most contested points can be on the nature of Ulysses’ character pertaining to heroism, and whether he is the typically zealous and gallant mythological ruler, or a misdirected and mistakenly na�ve individual, who obsessively seeks the unattainable together with a harmful contempt for the people for who also he will need to hold responsibility. Of course , the idea of heroism is definitely not the sole interpretation in the character of Ulysses which has been presented- suggestions of responsibility and of interpersonal symbolism are also put forward. Ever since its submitting, literary experts have understood “Ulysses” to get the underlying theme of heroism with it, and one of the supplementary interpretations of this is that the figure of Ulysses is in fact far from heroic. Chiasson states that Ulysses is “a kind of human being whom held a couple of ideas which will... [are] destructive of the complete fabric of his society”, suggesting that he was certainly not in fact a hero, yet someone without comprehension of responsibility pertaining to his persons, to the degree of self-centered desire over support of his people. This is exemplified by the words of the poem, where he details his persons as a “savage race”, who also “hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not really me”, featuring the arrogance and superiority that he feels over his people, and his succeeding contempt of life’s responsibilities. This is furthered by the robusto condescension of his explanation of his son, “blameless” and “discerning”, culminating in “He performs his job, I mine”, highlighting the lack of heroism in his selfish activities of chasing his aspirations of travel and excessive, rather than the basic humanitarian demands of his people. A secondary idea about his deficiency of heroism is a air of misguided, unachievable desires that permeates a few of the description of his character. His prefer to “To adhere to knowledge such as a sinking star/Beyond the utmost bound of human being thought” includes a sense of foolishness and excess upon reading this, as if it really is too far, as if the gallantry of the figure is being overtaken by this doomed “drunk delight”- by tradition a true leading man would know if you should stop, however many of the greatest heroes have gotten their own hubristic, tragic flaws- perhaps this inability to discover the boundaries of the “gleaming arch” is the structure can be put alongside Ulysses. Being a tertiary presentation of a insufficient heroism, the closing areas of the poem can be seen to take on a strengthen of popularity, almost a suicidal desire release juxtaposed against the strongly stirring unsupported claims that undercuts the entire composition. Critics have got agreed with this interpretation in the past- McCulloch conveying the “masterly, inspirational oratory of the concluding lines of this poem with a recognition that what it encourages is careless and suicidal”, and Buckley has the meaning that Ulysses does not have a complete “will to travel forward... but a identified retreat, a yearning, in back of allegedly fatigued rhythms, to join the great Achilles (or probably Arthur Hallam) in an Elysian retreat by life’s vexations”. The framework of the composition, written soon after Hallam’s loss of life certainly suits this meaning, with the suggestion of Tennyson wishing to regress from the studies of existence into a stupor in recollection of his friend, as well as the words from the poem “We may feel the Content Isles” and “Death closes all” as well reflect this kind of interpretation. Therefore the monologue truly does present an instance for Ulysses’ character to be described as far from heroic, as if he is synonymous with naivety and endless greed, disinterested and indifferent to those who it is his responsibility to serve. However , along with the business presentation of Ulysses being definately not heroic, the idea that Ulysses is indeed heroic immediately comes into concentrate. The images of consumption early on in the poem could recommend a dangerous dependence on his experience, but similarly could suggest the amazing quality of taking existence with both hands and tossing himself in to experience, “I will drink life to the lees” and “I include enjoy’d/Greatly, and also have suffered greatly”, the juxtaposed ideas heightening the feeling of interesting depth that Ulysses goes to as he fully activities life, and exactly how his relatively limitless desire could, or should be an example to the visitors, the “savage race”. This can be applied to really the poem- his thoughts about life on its own can be expanded to heroism. He declares that “How dull you should pause…/As in the event to inhale and exhale were life”, as if he can advocating the proactive way of life, that “pausing” turns lifestyle to a simple existence- perhaps echoing the second attitude of Tennyson to Hallam’s loss of life, that this individual in fact need to go on to continue is very own life, instead of fading to a mere presence. Furthermore, much of the hyperbolic imagery of the monologue, the concepts of “utmost bounds” and “gleaming arches” could exemplify the fascinacion and natural beauty of heroism, which for most of the Victorian people was what Ulysses represented, a revolt resistant to the bourgeoisie imposed laws of monontony, to merely “hoard, and sleep, and feed”. Finally, the acceptance of death’s implications and meaning inside the closing lines of the poem could symbolize an intelligent gallantry, as if Ulysses is a authentic hero, with the knowledge that he are not able to go on forever, “not now that strength that in old days/Moved earth and heaven”, his approval that there is a limit showing consideration for those who go with him, plus the idea of “to strive, to seek, and not to yield” contributing to the never-say-die attitude of your hero. Another interpretation in the final range is its supposed paradox underneath the resoluteness, built relevant to the similar attitude of Satan in Milton’s “Paradise Lost”, “never to submit or yield”, going back to the perception of Ulysses because an anti-hero of his own resolve. James D. Kissane address this idea of a heroism in both equally sides of his character with “desire to escape the wearisome present...; however it is all things considered the counter-melody to the main theme, a poor emotion which an endorsement must transcend. Thus the mood of ‘Ulysses’ is definitely resolute even though rooted in a way of some weakness as well as strength”. As well as the ever-present idea of gallantry, there are other interpretations in the dramatic monologue, and one of these is that of sociable responsibility, and its particular contrast with detachment in the vagaries of this and life, a similar motif to that shown in “The Lady of Shalott”. Ulysses is seen through the entire poem to actually want to escape by his own, enforced fact of Kingship, which is viewed through his description of his property “barren crags”, and his people “a fierce, ferocious race”. This is in contrast with for example , the “Lady of Shalott”, who also while not in true connection with “life”, includes a suppressed desire to be within it- what Ulysses sees since life is the full antithesis of what his life was set out to always be, and hence this creates a juxtaposition of his personality and adventure against his emotions for his people. This really is highlighted with all the contrast with the imagery previously mentioned with his glamorous desires and memories, examples including “Gleams that untravll’d world” and “Drunk joy of battle with my peers”, accentuating Ulysses’ lack of matter for his people, nevertheless at the same time demonstrating that inspite of his egotism, his desires for experience and your life are types that can be respected, and could be seen simply by him to be his model to his people, that they can should know him rather than “know(ing) not me”- it does as well however advise his inability to appearance back as well as be satisfied with his lot- they can only seek out more. One final interpretation of the poem can be how this fits in with Tennyson’s individual attitudes, and exactly how he could be viewed as symbolic towards the Victorian people. The poem was certainly written right after Hallam’s loss of life, and as a result numerous conclusions can be drawn concerning how the composition relates to Tennyson, and how he sees himself through the identity he retreats into. The idea of the poem being an exercise in catharsis intended for Tennyson is obviously relevant, and one of the thinking that can be pictured is that of a desire to go forward from Hallam’s death, since Charles Tennyson put it in his 1849 biography, “Tennyson “expressed his conclusion of the requirement of going forward and braving the battle of life, inspite of the bashing blow of Arthur’s [A. Holly Hallam’s] death”- this really is highlighted in Ulysses’ desire to have exploration and experience, “I will drink life towards the lees”. An additional idea is that of Tennyson wanting to regress to a stupor of death, since the resigned and almost taking once life air with the closing lines of the monologue indicates, to a extent, an illustration being “It may be the fact that gulfs is going to wash all of us down, /It may be that people will touch the Cheerful Isles”, like he wishes to join Hallam in the “Happy” comfort of death. Because effectively explained by Thomson, the poem could possibly be “recognizably the merchandise of internal debate”, suggesting that Tennyson’s confusion more than his personal reaction to Hallam’s death comes out in both sides to Ulysses’ frame of mind to excitement in the composition itself. Finally, the closing line, “To strive, to get, to find, and not to yield” came to be a symbol for the people of the Even victorian age, synonymous with proactivity and change that they can fully connect with, ironically contrary to the receptors of Ulysses in the monologue itself, his “savage race”. In conclusion, I agree that the figure of Ulysses is faraway from heroic. His contemptuousness when it comes to his persons, combined with the extremely hubristic and foolish wishes upon the best of knowledge shows him being an egocentrically misguided persona, despite some of the qualities pictured by Tennyson seeming, and being admirable. However , on a grander level I feel that this individual character of Ulysses is more driven simply by Tennyson’s feelings than the person portrayed in Homer’s “Odyssey” and Dante’s “Inferno”, while using character which represents more than anything the deeply personal and highly inconsistant emotion of grief.

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