Analysis of Dinner Party Essay

Analysis of Dinner Party Essay

The text under evaluation is named The Dinner Party, written by Nicholas Monsarrat. Monsarrat can be described as British novelist known for his sea reports and his works of fiction, The Group That Shed Its Brain and its sequel, Richer Than All His Tribe. The Dinner Party is actually a piece of frequentation. It lets us know about a wealthy man (uncle Octavian), who was a hospitable and friendly man, and liked to give parties – until January 3, 1925. It was his fifty-fifth birthday. As generally on this sort of a day he was giving a party, a party for twelve people. All of them were old friends. During the get together he was popular a magnificent diamond ring on the princess’s hand. Then the ring was passed from hand to hand, and so it had been lost or perhaps stolen even though all the guests were buddies. Nobody went back the princess’s ring backside, so it was never identified and that never made an appearance. Since that event Granddad Octavian never gave a single lunch or dinner get together for the last 30 years of his life. He died a relatively poor gentleman with the particular sadness of any hospitable number. The purpose of the writer is to present how it’s significant to acquire values, guidelines and that doesn’t make a difference if you are poor or wealthy. Uncle Octavian believed in his friends and suffered from this at the end together person, one of his close friends is were a robber. Uncle Octavian lost almost all his close friends and was never in a position to believe anyone from that time. The story is well-structured, so it may be split up into the following parts: exposition, side-effect, conflict, orgasm and denouement. The 1st part begins with “There are still a lot of rich people …” and ends with “…until January 3, 1925. “ It tells us regarding rich persons in their little princess world and claims that even those have their complications. In this component we discuss with the author, un-named, and the main character (my uncle Octavian), who is identified as a charming, favorable and most de gre a gre man with the help of epithets. The second part starts with the phrases “Let me personally tell you a story …” and ends with “all older and personal friends of my granddad Octavian. ” This verse describes the author’s feelings about staying at such event – the 55th birthday of his uncle, plus the party by itself. Here all of us observe some of uncle’s friends and stress how rich and important the friends of Octavian were the author uses metaphor “old flames”, and epithets such as “respective husbands”, “exceptional intelligence and his fabulous American wife”. The next part begins with “Towards the end of your wonderful dinner …” and finishes with “…saw her pass it on. ” Here we all become acquainted using a princess and her spectacular ring, liked by everyone in the table. The ring by itself is defined very vividly to stress it is importance for example here the writer uses an allusion to Genghis Khan. The orgasm of the account is the minute when everyone understands that the ring is lost or perhaps stolen. Below the author explains dreadful humiliation of Uncle Octavian’s appreciated friends and uncle’s belief in very good of his close friends. Vibrant epithets are more comfortable with show growing anxiety among the guests: dreadful, fruitless. Inside the epilogue we see that the diamond ring was not by no means found and Octavian perished poor man, never throwing a single get together again when he lost his trust in people. Monsarrat uses antithesis to convey how uncle’s life is promoting since his 55th birthday: at the beginning he writes that he was “a happy abundant man”, towards the end “comparatively poor”. Poor this is also a metaphor used not only to describe his financial status, but as well to show his inner feelings after that day – he lost his trust, his beliefs were deceived. The tone with the story can be grammatical and ironical concurrently, as the theme is definitely judging persons of being this kind of liars even among close friends – the theme itself is quite ironical.

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