The parallels between The Crucible and the Rwanda Genocide Essay

The parallels between The Crucible and the Rwanda Genocide Essay

The Parallels between The Crucible and The Rwanda Genocide The designs of rights, community and sacrifice in The Crucible will be universal and is identified in numerous modern incidents in history, such as Rwanda Genocide. The genocide in Rwanda and The Salem Witch Tracks in The Crucible have many dazzling similarities, primarily these are: the hunting down and killing of the group of people referred to as being different, the mass killing of individuals for zero valid reason plus the taking of revenge over a whole group for the acts of just one or more persons of that group. Common to the two of these events is a ruthless hunting down of victims. The all judges in The Crucible pressure Abigail and the ladies for the names of feasible witches. Their particular mission is always to convict as many as possible, with no questioning if perhaps they may be blameless. The idol judges are merciless predators hunting their prey, just like the persistent Hutu’s searching for the Tutsi’s in every part of Rwanda. The Hutu’s rush into people’s homes, ruthlessly searching for any kind of Tutsi, all set to savagely self applied them with machetes before eradicating them. Any Tutsi they find, no matter what age or sex, gets completely slaughtered in order to totally eliminate the tribe. An additional similarity is the relative escalation of death and homicide once the trials/genocide had began. The amounts of deaths in The Crucible had been much greater than anyone at the start could have believed. Once Abigail realised the extent in the damage your woman had induced and saw how out of hand the trials had gotten, your woman fled. The violence in Rwanda come to extremes far greater than expected and became a genocide, causing the fatalities of between 500 000-1 000 000 people, with thousands and thousands of brutally butchered corpses littering the pavements. The objective behind the two events is usually revenge. Inside the Crucible, Abigail initially uses the idea of witchcraft to save her own skin, she then simply realises that she may use it as excuse to seek revenge in Elizabeth Proctor for dismissing her and destroying her relationship with John Proctor. Similarly, the Hutu’s seek revenge on the Tutsi’s for shooting straight down their director, killing him and everyone more in the airline. The Hutu’s believe the Tutsi’s had been trying to get back power. There were a long history of rivalry and violence among these two people and the killing of the president was the catalyst ignited the voracious fire of payback. The Hutu’s began their manhunt to look for and kill the Tutsi’s in payback for the years of perceived oppression when the Tutsi’s ruled Rwanda. Like John Proctor in The Crucible, there also is a leading part in the Rwanda Genocide – Paul Rusesabagina. They both equally display durability in standing for what is right, they usually betray their friends plus they both display great valor to do precisely what is right, even if it means restricting themselves. In The Crucible, as things get out of hand, David takes this on him self to endure the expert and set things right. Even when standing up against the church areas suspicion in him, Ruben will not bargain his values and arguements for what this individual believes is correct. This is the same fight Paul Rusesabagina performs. Paul refuses to fall into the violence and hatred between Hutu’s and Tutsi’s. He questions the idea that Hutu’s vs. Tutsi’s. This individual himself, a Hutu, can be married into a Tutsi and he will not really let himself be threatened into changing his beliefs or in following the particular other Hutu’s are doing. Like a Hutu, Paul is likely to despise the Tutsi’s and also to be a part of the violence as well as the killing. Instead he consumes the destitute, terrified Tutsi refugees and turned the hotel he was managing into a refugee camp. Paul recognized that this individual and his family would be wiped out if the Hutu’s discovered what he was performing, but he did not flop. He had taken them in, protected these people and provided for them when ever no one more had the courage to. He refused to betray or abandon his family or his people. This individual saved the lives of 1 268 political refugees through his sheer strength, intelligence, willpower and bravery. Paul’s refusal to betray his people to save him self is strikingly similar to John’s refusal to betray his friends. Though his unfaithfulness would have salvaged his existence and allowed him to be with his family, he wasn't able to do it. John’s refusal to betray his friends leads to the ultimate sacrifice. His final act of defiance, to refuse to participate something untruthful, ultimately led to his fatality. This emphasises his durability of figure and his enormous courage. Just like John Proctor, Paul as well made surrender and took great risks. Paul surrender his residence, his task, the safety of his family and was possibly willing to sacrifice his life to save the lives of people he didn’t even understand, but was happy to protect. He gave assistance to anyone who needed it,  Hutu or Tutsi. Both of these works of sacrifice, from only one individual, triggered the conserving of many lives. The themes of justice, community and sacrifice inside the Crucible are universal and timeless. The Crucible shows us about these themes and teaches us to identify them in historical events. The baseless killing of blameless people simply because they belong to some group is repeated over and over in history along with how a courage of one or various individual/s can result in the keeping of multiple lives. There always are individuals in brutal circumstances who display enormous bravery and humanity in standing up for what is right and not blindly following other folks; individuals who have the courage to question power. The Crucible teaches us that the valor of one specific can save the lives of many if that they only have the strength to query and to operate for what they believe. The Crucible teaches all of us to identify these kinds of themes in real life situations. In addition to the Rwanda Genocide, the relevance in the Crucible can be manifested consist of recent situations, we just have to consider university girl Malala Yousafzi who had been shot inside the head by the Taliban following speaking out and standing up for the right of ladies to go to university in Afghanistan. The themes of justice, community and sacrifice are evident in The Crucible and The Crucible teaches us to recognise these people in real life situations and teaches all of us the importance of courage and sacrifice, as well as the great impact that one brave individual can easily have in a horrific and seemingly unattainable situation.

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