The Nightmare of the American Dream Essay

The Nightmare of the American Dream Essay

The “American Dream”, a thought that success, liberty and equality exists according to each man’s capabilities regardless of social status and racial, is one which appeals to just about every American via all walks of life. After the 1930s, the importance of realizing success, freedom and equality started to be a priority inside the lives of countless, including the Natives. The belief in the “American Dream” was deeply embedded inside their hearts in a quest to eliminate stereotypes of the community just like being poverty- stricken and primitive warriors who belonged in the jungles as they started to assimilate into the urban traditions of a light dominated culture. However , as one examines the American culture today, these kinds of stereotypes still exists and may even have been important in the opportunities presented towards the Native American communities or maybe the lack thereof. Inside the story “The Red Convertible”, Louise Erdrich employs images associated with flexibility as ironies in order to argue that the “American Dream” is known as a farce as the stereotypes attached to person communities, in this case, the Indigenous American neighborhoods will never be cracked and the rely on such dreams will at some point lead to life-altering and undesirable outcomes. Erdrich consistently uses the image with the convertible the fact that brothers bought which will usually signify freedom and status linked to the ownership of an auto in an ironical manner to exhibit that the siblings will never be cost-free and revered in culture as a result of their ethnicity. Their colour, “of course it had been red” (1-2), is a reminder of how Native American neighborhoods have were living with the stigma of being phone Red Indians for centuries thus suggesting they may never always be free of this kind of derogatory brands. The friends bought the vehicle “reposed, calm and gleaming” (34) just like they bought into the guaranteeing idea of equality in the “American Dream”. Paralleling the quest of the glistening car to Henry who to keep for the war several Native Americans were drafted to fight for the frontline, Lyman “had it up on blocks in the yard or 50 percent taken aside, because the very long trip do a hard task on it” just as light-hearted Henry returns from the war a damaged man, needing “repairs”. The greatest irony with the tragic closing of the collapsible sinking into the river, representing the smashed dreams of equal rights and success as Henry returns to the same poverty-stricken life of the reservation which will he presumed would alter at the end of the war. To increase illustrate the irony of the “American Dream”, Erdrich compares Henry to the rabbit which is essentially an animal that exists widely in the crazy but who also exists to get preyed in the same way Native Americans assuming that they had been equals in society nevertheless were in fact preyed after the stereotype that they had been brave, natural warriors would you have skills to fight ruthlessly inside the war. When Henry came back from the battle, he was “jumpy and mean” (123) so when he was nonetheless, “it was your kind of stillness that you find in a rabbit when it interrupts before it can bolt” (128-130). Henry was used as a victim in the war based on a stereotype with no regard for his mankind, now would bolt to protect himself as he realizes which the dream of equality he supported was a rest which exploited his ethnicity instead of protecting it. While Lyman narrated another stereotype of Indigenous Indians in the story: “We liked to tease him that they really wanted him to get his Indian nose” (91-92), has more truth to it as many Natives were made to fight in the front line during the warfare resulting in a great alarming level of deaths. Lastly, Erdrich ironically uses imagery of nature while embodiments of hope and new beginnings and juxtaposed them up against the brothers’ dreams of a better life which was disastrously crushed. Lyman describes during when Holly suggests to take the car out for a spin after this individual fixed it: It was early spring. The sun was shining very bright. My only sis, Bonita, who was just eleven years old was released and made all of us stand with each other for a photo. (194-196) The imagery of springtime which in turn symbolizes wish and existence and the Sun which is a symbol of a sparkling future is actually the friends had supported as they bought into the thought of the “American Dream” as a way of escaping their poverty stricken lives in the reservations. However , after Henry “squint against the glare” (212) of the Sunlight in the image as he may no longer rely on the dream after being exploited in the war. As Lyman after examines the style, he knows that Holly “might have drawn back, because the dark areas on his confront are profound as holes” (214-215) suggests that Henry will not again always be the person that he was possibly in the hopeful time of Springtime, he will continually be a patient of the war and stereotypes hence unable to pursue toward achieve success because promised in the “American Dream” he had assumed earlier. In the later area of the story, Erdrich uses the image of the sunshine again, simply this time in a deference towards the tragedy of Henry’s too much water as he is not able to live living of low income and lose hope as well as to the failure from the American dream which would not deliver the promise of equality and freedom because “the sunshine is down”(294). The ironical use of photos of freedom in “The Red Convertible” shows that the “American Dream” did not deliver its assure of equal rights regardless of social status and ethnicity as stereotypes about the Native Americans persist and such stereotypes not only is able to hurt someone but may also have tragic consequences just like deaths of Native Americans in alarming amounts in the conflict as well as the loss of life of Henry as he not anymore believed in the dream.

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